Book Review: “Framed” by Kelley Armstrong

Posted September 8, 2021 by Kathy Davie in Book Reviews / 0 Comments

Book Review: “Framed” by Kelley Armstrong

I received this book for free from Free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

"Framed" by Kelley Armstrong
Genres: Urban Fantasy
Published by Author on January 2008
Pages: 42
Format: PDF
Source: Free

Goodreads
Also by this author: Omens, Wild Justice, Sea of Shadows, Visions, The Masked Truth, City of the Lost, Forest of Ruin, Betrayals, A Darkness Absolute, Indigo, Rituals, The Unquiet Past, This Fallen Prey, Stolen, Rough Justice, Dime Store Magic, Industrial Magic, Haunted, Broken, Dark Screams: Volume Nine, No Humans Involved,, Waking the Witch, Portents, Missing, Alone in the Wild, Watcher in the Woods, Otherworld Secrets, Wherever She Goes, "The Case of the Half-Demon Spy", "Truth & Consequences", "Territorial", "Escape", "Adventurer", Otherworld Chills, A Stranger in Town, "Bargain", Hex on the Beach, "Recruit", "Checkmate"

A free short story in the Women of the Otherworld urban fantasy series, revolving around a diverse group of strong, smart, and skillful supernatural women and their equally talented mates. The focus is on Nick Sorrentino.

If you’re interested, there is a chronological listing of the Women of the Otherworld books on my website.

My Take

Twelve pages in and Armstrong has already introduced us to Nick’s world, his concerns, interests, his assessment of a murder, and the blackmail statement.

Hmm, stalking is research? I guess that’s one way to put a spin on it.

When we meet Rita, I gotta wonder why anyone would want to stay with her. I don’t get why she needs a taxi when her office is three doors away?

Nick’s actions on this blackmail deal aren’t helping him change his father’s impression of him. One that Nick is desperate to change, to show his father he’s worthy. And this blackmail attempt tempts Nick into fixing it rather than asking for help.

The story moves and has some action, but it’s mostly talk with Nick as the center of it all. Yep, it means that Armstrong is using third person protagonist point-of-view from Nick’s perspective.

The frame-up is interesting enough, and I do like how Nick handled it. It sure ties in to his job. But that ending . . . It was too abrupt, and I want more. I want to be in on that hunt and see the resolution.

The Story

Poor Nick, targeted for being what he is, does some research on paranormal romances with werewolves. But trying on that alpha character in the books is not his cup of tea.

Nor is Paul’s next “request” palatable.

The Characters

Nick Sorrentino, a werewolf, is quite the playboy but working to change his image, doing graphic design for his father’s company. Janine is his young secretary more than willing to provide additional services.

Antonio Sorrentino is his father with low expectations of his son. Bill Cheung is one of the Sorrentinos’ clients.

The Stonehaven Pack is . . .
. . . led by Jeremy Danvers. Jeremy looks on the brilliant Clay Danvers as his son. Elena is Clay’s journalist mate.

Paul did the drop-off. Supposedly, Paul’s about-to-be ex-wife, ball-buster, and part demon, Rita, has a thing for werewolves. Darren, another part demon, is/was Paul’s friend. Grannus is Paul’s Druidic deity. Brianna is one of the employees where Rita works.

Tyler Lake is a mutt.

The Cover and Title

The cover has a black and white background of a brick wall and a barred window with a scruffy-looking guy in a long black overcoat and knit hat, leaning against a pole. Filmstrips in black and white angle across the top left corner and act as a border on the right. The author’s name is white with a black shadow across the guy’s calves. The title is vertical in an embossed red with a black shadow.

The title is what Nick is, “Framed”.

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